theoddmentemporium : 
 
  Lady Godiva   was an 11th-century   Anglo-Saxon   noblewoman who, according to   legend  , rode naked through the streets of   Coventry   in order to gain a   remission   of the oppressive   taxation   imposed by her husband on his tenants. The name “Peeping Tom” for a   voyeur   originates from later versions of this legend in which a man named Tom had watched her ride and was struck blind or dead.  
  Lady Godiva was the wife of   Leofric  , Earl of   Mercia  .   They had one proved son     Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia  .     Lady Godiva’s name occurs in charters and the     Domesday survey  , though the spelling varies.     
    According to the popular story,   Lady Godiva took pity on the people of Coventry, who were suffering grievously under her husband’s oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would strip naked and ride through the streets of the town. Lady Godiva took him at his word and, after issuing a proclamation that all persons should stay indoors and shut their windows, she rode through the town, clothed only in her long hair. Just one person in the town, a tailor ever afterwards known as   Peeping Tom  , disobeyed her proclamation in one of the most famous instances of   voyeurism  .   In the story, Tom bores a hole in his shutters so that he might see Godiva pass, and is struck blind.   In the end, Godiva’s husband keeps his word and abolishes the onerous taxes.

theoddmentemporium:

Lady Godiva was an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry in order to gain a remission of the oppressive taxation imposed by her husband on his tenants. The name “Peeping Tom” for a voyeur originates from later versions of this legend in which a man named Tom had watched her ride and was struck blind or dead.

Lady Godiva was the wife of Leofric, Earl of MerciaThey had one proved son Aelfgar, Earl of Mercia. Lady Godiva’s name occurs in charters and the Domesday survey, though the spelling varies. 

According to the popular story, Lady Godiva took pity on the people of Coventry, who were suffering grievously under her husband’s oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would strip naked and ride through the streets of the town. Lady Godiva took him at his word and, after issuing a proclamation that all persons should stay indoors and shut their windows, she rode through the town, clothed only in her long hair. Just one person in the town, a tailor ever afterwards known as Peeping Tom, disobeyed her proclamation in one of the most famous instances of voyeurism. In the story, Tom bores a hole in his shutters so that he might see Godiva pass, and is struck blind. In the end, Godiva’s husband keeps his word and abolishes the onerous taxes.